Menu

Our Cause

Life is not good for some kids. Life is Good Playmakers work to change that.

34 million children in the U.S. alone have suffered at least one Adverse Childhood Experience.

ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCE STUDY, CDC

The Reality of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are all types of abuse, neglect, and other traumatic experiences that occur to kids under the age of 18. These experiences have been linked to risky health behaviors, chronic health conditions, low life expectancy, and early death. They are the single greatest health threat facing our nation’s kids today.

ACEs include but are not limited to:

Verbal Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Physical Abuse

Emotional Neglect

Physical Neglect


Emotional Neglect

Physical Neglect

Mental Illness

Mental Illness

Domestic Violence

Drug & Alcohol Use

Parental Incarceration

Parental Separation

Domestic Violence

Drug & Alcohol Use


Parental Incarceration


Parental Separation


Verbal Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Physical Abuse


Emotional Neglect

Physical Neglect

Mental Illness

Domestic Violence


Drug & Alcohol Use


Parental Incarceration


Parental Separation

As the number of ACEs increases, so does the potential risk for

Heart Disease
Lung Cancer
Suicide
Depression
Anxiety
Diabetes
Early Death
Health Risk Behaviors
Disability

Young, developing brains are highly sensitive to stress, and will not fully develop emotional, social, and cognitive capacity if kids are continuously responding to threats during their first few years of life. When children are continually responding to adversity, the architecture of their developing brains can be damaged leading to life-long consequences. The greater the number of ACEs, the greater risk – experiencing four or more ACEs is associated with significantly increased risk for 7 out of 10 leading adult causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, COPD, diabetes, Alzheimers and suicide. Life expectancy is reduced by 20 years among adults who experienced six or more ACEs as kids.

The Ace Study

It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.

Frederick Douglass